Rathlin Writers

The Call

The call came he was there
The challenge was great but would he dare
To cast aside all hesitations
To take his chance, no reservations

To seize and forge the dream he sought
Indifference around he fought and fought
To make his world a better place
To live content with God’s great grace

A man who faced all-conquering seas
Yet rose again to fortune seize
The battles fought his liberation
The prize achieved his jubilation

With mediocrity all around
A man like this can still astound
We grieve and remember him
And his almighty heart within

Mary Cecil

Obituary of Tommy Cecil

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The Harsh Winds of Rathlin: Stories of Rathlin Shipwrecks by Tommy Cecil. ISBN 0-948154-65-9

Rathlin’s Rugged Story: from an Islander’s Perspective by Augustine McCurdy. ISBN 0-948154-54-6. Rathlinman’s books

A History of the Island of Rathlin by Mrs Gage. ISBN 0-948154-87-X

Flora of Rathlin Island by Margaret J Dickson

Rathlin: Its Island Story by Wallace Clark. ISBN 0-948154-76-4

Birds of Rathlin by Gerry Bond

Rathlin Island: As I Knew It by Alex Morrison. ISBN 0-948154-33-11-11

Rathlin Island and the Modern World (ebook) by W Forsythe

FICTION

The Friends of Rathlin Island by Stewart Dalby. ISBN 0-9780954423391

Turbulent Priests by Colin Bateman. ISBN: 0-9780006498018

Rathlin Writers Festival

Rathlin’s Golden Hare

You’ll see plenty of rabbits on Rathlin but look out also for the unique Irish hare. With smaller ears, a white tail and reddish coat, this native Irish species is quite distinct from the Brown hare found in Britain. They can be found all over the island and there is even a rare local genetic mutation – an albino – with a much lighter coat and blue eyes, called the Rathlin Golden hare.
Islanders see off hare coursers

Interview with award-winning Rathlin photographer, Tom McDonnell

The Manor House

The Manor House at Rathlin harbour

The Manor House

The large Georgian house which dominates Rathlin’s harbour was built in the 1870s for the Gage family, who bought the island in 1746 from Lord Antrim for £1,750. The main house also incorporated work-rooms for weavers built in the 1760s and some former cottages. The Gages also built the island’s walled garden (it is said that the soil for it was shipped from Scotland), corn mill, a boat-house and kelp store.

The last member of the family to live at the Manor House was Brigadier Rex Gage, CBE, MC, who died in 1973. It lay derelict for a while before it was taken over by the National Trust and then re-opened in 1998 as a 12-room hotel.

www.rathlinmanorhouse.co.uk

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A Rathlin countess

One of the more remarkable members of the Gages was Dorothea. On a visit to Baden Baden in 1864, she attracted the attention of Prince Albrecht of Warbeck and Pyrmonte. He pursued her to Rathlin and they married in Dublin Castle the same year. She was made Countess von Roden in 1867 and died in Germany in 1883 at the age of 48.
Antrim biographies